‘The Walking Dead’ Thank You Video Reminds Us Just How British the Cast Is!

Lawrence Yee
The Walking Dead TV
The Walking Dead TV

The first thing that struck me while watching The Walking Dead cast celebrate 100 episodes was how much time has passed — eight years! That, and all the posh British accents.

Most fans know series lead Andrew Lincoln (Rick Grimes) hails from London. His breakout role was as the cue card-carrying Mark in 2003’s Love Actually, pining for the married Juliet (Keira Knightley).

But did you know Lennie James (Morgan) is also British? As is Jesus (Tom Payne). Newly promoted regular Pollyanna McIntosh (Jadis) is also from the U.K. (Scotland, to be exact). Her character — the leader of the Scavengers — speaks very little. But when she does, she speaks in pidgin English.

And if you detect a slight British lilt from Lauren Cohan (Maggie) when she drops her Southern drawl, it’s because she grew up in the U.K.

Of course, British actors playing American characters in comics is not uncommon: Professor Xavier has been played by two Brits (Patrick Stewart and James McAvoy), as has Spider-Man (Andrew Garfield and Tom Holland). X-Men stars Nicholas Hoult (Beast) and Sophie Turner (Jean Grey)? Both Brits. Other Brits playing American Marvel superheroes? Benedict Cumberbath (Dr. Strange), Aaron Taylor Johnson (Quicksilver), Hayley Atwell (Peggy Carter) and Ioan Gruffudd (Mr. Fantastic).

And on the D.C. front, the Batman (Christian Bale) and Superman (Henry Cavill) actors grew up in the U.K.

You can watch TWD cast drop all their accents when the return to the small screen this October for the show’s milestone 100th episode.

Lawrence Yee
Lawrence is Editor in Chief of FANDOM. He grew up loving X-Men, Transformers, and Japanese-style role playing games like Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy. First-person shooters make him incredibly nauseous.
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