10 PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds Tips and Tricks from a Pro

FANDOM caught up with professional PUBG player Harry "LaytoN" Layton who shares with us some of his top tips for how to get better at the game.
Jamie Shepherd
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PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds has been taking the gaming world by storm in recent months. The “Battle Royale” themed shooter pits 100 players against each other in a fast paced survival of the fittest battle to the death.

Harry “LaytoN” Layton, is a professional player for Team Kinguin – widely regarded as one of Europe’s best PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds teams. The team formed over two months ago with a collection of players consistently at the top of the game’s official leaderboards, and PUBGOnline’s European tournaments.

FANDOM caught up with LaytoN to discover his list of top PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds pro tips that the pros use to stay at the top of their game:

Top 10 PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds Pro Tips

Know the map

“Know where high value buildings are across the map because it’s true that some buildings aren’t as good as others,” explained LaytoN. “If you are looted well enough, get there early.”

“In smaller shrinks, don’t always look at the map. Look at the land because the buildings aren’t always key. Instead, look for ridges and dips in the land.”

Understand your weapon

“Find a weapon that you like, and stick with it,” said LaytoN. “Practicing recoil and the feel of one weapon at a time is a good thing. Get used to something to the point you are able to laser moving targets, and then move on.”

Plan ahead

“In nearly every situation, good planning is key. Always have a plan before you move anywhere, discuss it with your team. In busy drop zones like Pochinki, if the circle is with you, it’s a good thing to camp for intel.

“Try and have a crossfire set up with your squad, listen for steps and shots and work slowly.”

Coordinate with your team

“If you are fighting outside, then you need to know your flanks. It takes 10 seconds for an enemy to split away from their squad and to find a nice little hill that leaves you exposed,” warns LaytoN.

“Either hold the flank, or move away from it. Know when it’s right to flank, know when it’s greedy.

“This is something that needs to be implemented into squads depending on play style. Some do it well, others are more defensive players, and that’s ok. You absolutely need different types of players in a squad for it to be an effective squad. It’s no use having four players all going for the same flank because they are hungry for kills.”

Be patient

“Being able to control your adrenaline and stay patient in clutch situations will pay off. You don’t have to peak that KAR98, because he has to move eventually.”

Use the camera to your advantage

“PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds uses both first- and third-person cameras, which means you view the action over-the-shoulder of your character. This is actually a useful gameplay feature, as it means you can look around corners using the camera without actually revealing yourself to the opponent.”

Know when to stop sniping

“Landing a headshot always feels good, but getting obsessed can mean losing games. Nine times out of 10 on a moving target it is more efficient to use an assault rifle.”

Loot efficiently

“Call out spare level two items when you don’t need them, pick up attachments that your team needs, and keep a count on meds. Find a safe spot after looting phase and trade.”

When to go for supply crates

“Supply crates are often full of high level gear, but it’s important to know when to take the risk to get them,” advises LaytoN. “If you are stacked with gear, it’s normally not worth the risk unless you can guarantee that there are no other squads around. If you are under-looted, you can send one man with your remaining members supporting. You can also use supply crates as bait, and set up around them waiting for opponents to take the risk themselves.”

Learn from your mistakes

“Remember that everything in PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds is situational, and you’ll have to draw on previous experience and game knowledge in nearly every live scenario,” said LaytoN.

“When you lose, remember why you lost. Bad positioning? Could you have waited and played the edge of the shrink? Should you have bothered to breach the compound when you knew there was a team there?”

“In my opinion, game sense trumps all. You can’t always win, but you can be very consistent.”


You can find LaytoN on Twitter, and streaming the game with his teammates Larsen, Fuzzface, and Ibiza live on Twitch.tv.

Jamie Shepherd
Software engineer at Fandom. Lover of technology!