Captain’s Log: Euclid System; Year 2245 — Home System – Planet 1.b

The Gek

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After acquiring my hyperdrive and making the journey to the neighboring system, I was immediately overcome with a feeling of anxiety. My relationship with the Gek people got off to a rocky start after an encounter with one of their ancient monoliths. Without knowing any of their vocabulary, my decision at the monolith exposed my ignorance and caused my standing with the Gek to suffer. I chalked it up to being lost in translation and tried to learn from my mistake. I then decided to try and seek out a Gek on this new planet to introduce myself.

Not too long after taking off from the monolith, I spotted a trading post in the distance and decided to touch down. Inside was a Gek trader. I tried to make up for my lack of language by bribing him with some wares from my inventory. He accepted my offering only to ridicule me and became defensive as he insinuated that I was insulting him with my lowly gesture of Carbon supplies.

Flustered, I stepped out of the outpost and sauntered over to my Rasamama S36 and looked up at the sky, wishing I could be home just then. The hyperdrive that I’ve acquired has been a blessing and a curse. While it’s taking me to another corner of the galaxy, my opinion of what an explorer should be has changed significantly.

The Vy’keen

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My time with the Vy’keen people in my home system was special. Their rugged, warrior culture and intimidating appearance is a thinly veiled facade. They greeted me with warm words, gifts, and always lent a helping hand. Hospitality was the last thing I expected when I first encountered a Vy’keen warrior. Yet that is always what I received.

Nostalgic memories flooded my thoughts as I sat in my ship — lost. Should I stay here to repair the newfound relationships with the Gek or just move on? I missed my old friends and still had so much of their system to see. Their planets were rich with resources, friendly creatures and breathtaking vistas.

As I crafted another Warp Cell to prepare my ship for another potential jump to a new system, my mind began to wander. Where to next? The choices are endless. Maybe I’ll have better luck with the species at the next system. Will their planets be as bountiful? The animals friendly?

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Snapping back to reality, I popped in my Warp Cell and started to head towards the clouds. I was happy to leave this planet and get back into space where I felt more welcome. Looking at the Atlas to see the next uncharted territory left me feeling empty. While the nameless systems and its exciting prospects once gave me an eagerness to explore, my mind was too busy reminiscing about my experiences with the Vy’keen.

My time as an explorer has not gone as I expected. I assumed I would be brave, unabashed in discovering these new frontiers, but my human nature has hindered me. Many people use the phrase “life is too short” when individuals question if they should do something. I’m beginning to subscribe to the opposite school of thought: “life is long.” There will be plenty of opportunities for me to continue my travels. As I write this, my ship has dropped out of warp and I’m slowly approaching a familiar trading post. The anticipation of seeing a friend brings a smirk to my face. It feels good to be home — for now.


Our No Man’s Sky captain’s log is a fictional account of one man’s journey to the center of the galaxy. The series will examine the alien lifeforms, flora, fauna, and planets he encounters and visits along the way.  

Nico Faraguna
I enjoy playing PC games, watching motorcycle racing, and eating good grub