More Comics We Want To See Adapted To The Screen

Bob Aquavia
Comics Movies
Comics Movies TV

We here at Fandom love comics, movies, t.v. and with all the announcements from Comic-Con we wanted to throw out some more ideas for comics that we feel would be great either on a big or small screen. Our previous ideas for Vertigo comics can be found here. This time around, we dug into some lesser known or smaller series that are outside of the norm.

Wildfire

The end of the world starts small in Wildfire
The end of the world starts small in Wildfire

Something that would make a killer film is Top Cow’s Wildfire. We’ve seen man’s forays into science go horribly wrong before, but not like this. Much as The Terminator showed how our attempts to create the perfect system end up with our destruction, Wildfire shows what can go wrong when we meddle with nature.

Seeking to solve world hunger, a team of scientists succeed in creating a strain of flower that grows to full-bloom from seed in a matter of minutes. But, at their public demonstration, a crazed environmentalist smashes the container. Not fully tested, some pollen makes it to the world outside and things (literally) grow out of control. Spreading through the local ecosystem, the entire city soon comes under threat from fast growing plants. A napalm strike only increases the problem as it warps the genetic structure and causes all the plants to grow larger as well as faster.

Although nature has been the opposition before (like in The Happening), Wildfire could still make a fairly good flick if handled properly. There’s an oppressive military, some good military, enough death to make things dangerous, and even a romantic subplot. It has all the markers of a good film and just needs a decent cast and crew to make it happen. (Graham Host)

The Wicked + The Divine

Introduction to the Pantheon
Introduction to the Pantheon in The Wicked + The Divine

My pick for a comic I’d LOVE to see as a tv/Netflix series is The Wicked + The Divine. The premise is that gods are resurrected into human hosts every ninety years; they become celebrities and rock stars, worshiped like they always were but with a catch: they’ll die a mere two years from when they reborn. The Pantheon (as they’re called) consist of gods and goddesses from all across religions and civilizations: Amaterasu, Baal, Lucifer, Sakhmet, Woden, among many others. Each has unique gifts and powers, but all have the common thread that they are both human and deity.

The initial narrative of the series follows a teenage fan, Laura, as she meets and eventually befriends some of the Pantheon. Without spoiling anything (because seriously, if you haven’t already, go out and read it), she becomes far more involved with the gods’ machinations than she ever would have dreamed. With its heady mix of sex, drugs, magic, murder, and rock n’ roll, to do proper justice to the series it would have to be on pay cable or Netflix. (Bob Aquavia)

We Stand On Guard

American mech against the Canadian flag from We Stand On Guard
American mech against the Canadian flag from We Stand On Guard

USA vs Canada, which is the better country? That has been a debate which has been raging across time. Brian K Vaughn’s We Stand On Guard tells the story of a conflict between Canada and the United States of America set in the 22nd century. The story follows Amber Roos, a young woman who had lost her parents after an attack at a young age. While on the run and separated from her brother. Amber eventually runs into a group of Canadian resistance fighters known as the Two-Four. The Two-Four has a diverse range of individuals, including a Syrian refugee and an Aboriginal Canadian of Cree descent. Together, Amber and the Two-Four join forces to rebel against the United States of America, who have invaded and taken over Canada.

At the end of the 6 issues, the story was left open with a shocking revelation and cliffhanger so closure or a continuation would me greatly appreciated. Many of the characters could also benefit with expansions on their stories. While there may not be enough source material for a full series, We Stand on Guard could benefit from an 8-10 episode miniseries. If not, a featured film could also do the comic justice. (Marcus Yap)

Saga

Marko and Alana first lay eyes on each other in Saga
Marko and Alana first lay eyes on each other in Saga

Saga can only work as a Netflix series. The Duffer Brothers’ work on Stranger Things has shown that you can tightly wind story elements around a shorter season format to force audience attention. While Brian K. Vaughn is still unveiling the world of Saga in the comics, the series could push deeper. Taking inspiration from Fiona Staples’ insane visuals, the cinematography and original score choices can find a new sci-fi taste for a modern era. As revolutionary as Star Wars was for blending samurai drama with Saturday morning cliffhangers, Saga could do the same but in an adult manner. Think David Cronenberg directing “The Battle of Algiers”: Mangled and distorted bodies, ghosts of dead teenagers and tree spaceships all forming key elements of a new TV push.

The first season would give the audience a basic introduction to the universe, the push to save the main characters’ baby and a deep dive into the driving conflict between the worlds. Later seasons would then address how the leads grew apart, and explore the new environments and characters they come across on their journey back to each other. The wild tonal shifts would be appreciated, as the show could stay grounded in the sci-fi/fantasy elements while presenting a realistic family drama. In a perfect world, I could see it lasting 5-6 seasons of 8 episodes a piece, ideally in a hour-long drama format. (Troy Anderson)

This group of stories is only a tiny drop in the bucket. The potential is out there for so many more adaptations of our favorite series, in all different types of formats. Hopefully, some of these move forward to the larger audience that they deserve.

Bob Aquavia
I occasionally put words to page as a Fan Contributor by way of sunny Las Vegas. A fan of books (comic and otherwise), movies, tv, pro wrestling and video games. A periodic traveler and wanderer; also, more coffee than man.
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